Money, Markets and Democracy

Course Details

Why do financial and real estate markets follow patterns of boom and bust? Money and the financial markets have become major driving forces of change around the globe. Their increasing power and influence are creating profound shifts in our economy and in society. This course will cover the origins of modern financial markets and the present day global network of international trading. All of the major financial instruments and assets will be studied in terms of their characteristics and functions – including stocks, bonds, derivatives, currencies, hedge funds and housing. How have these assets become so important in today’s world? Why was the U.S. housing market seen as the epicenter of the recent financial collapse? The growing interconnectedness of the financial markets and the general economy has prompted governments around the world to become more involved. Who has the real power in the marketplace? How have compensation incentives and excessive greed created significant and negative effects on markets and society? These and other questions will be explored and discussed in the course. Category and Level: Society, Culture and Commerce, Lower Level Restrictions: None

Contact: Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences and Innovative Learning
Course Code: ECON 2000

Courses may not be offered each semester. To verify whether this course is being offered this semester and the fees, please contact the Registrar’s Office at 416-675-5000 or check the website for further information.

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